Posts for: December, 2014

By Woodland Family Dentistry
December 29, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
DentalImplantsRequireCleaningandMaintenanceJustLikeNaturalTeeth

There’s no doubt dental implants are an effective choice for restoring both the form and function of missing teeth. But although they aren’t susceptible to tooth decay as with natural teeth, the bone and gum tissues that surround them are. Implants, therefore, require the same cleaning and maintenance as natural teeth.

A dental implant is actually a root replacement, a titanium post surgically imbedded in the jawbone. Because titanium is osteophilic (“bone-loving”), bone will naturally grow around it, making the implant more secure over time. Atop the implant is an abutment to which an artificial crown, the visible portion of the implant, is attached. The abutment is surrounded and supported by connective fibers within the gum tissue that hold the tissue against the implant surface.

This attachment differs significantly from natural teeth’s attachment to the jawbone, which attach to a tooth’s root through the periodontal ligament. The tiny fibers of the ligament hold teeth in place; its elasticity allows for tiny adjustments in a tooth’s position in response to changes in other teeth and bone. The ligament is also rich in blood supply that enriches the area with nutrients and provides resources to fight and resist infection.

An implant doesn’t have this same degree of defense against infection. Without proper hygiene, a layer of bacterial plaque known as biofilm can develop on the crown surface of both natural teeth and restorations. In addition, an infectious condition specific to implants known as peri-implantitis can set in the gum tissues surrounding the implant. This can lead to bone loss (sometimes very rapid) and eventual loss of the implant.

Although your daily hygiene won’t require special toothbrushes or other devices for implant cleaning, your professional cleanings will. The metal instruments (known as curettes) used to clean natural teeth could damage implant surfaces. The hygienist will use devices made of plastic or resin rather than metal, and nylon or plastic sheaths or tips on ultrasonic equipment that are specially designed for implant cleaning.

While maintaining dental implants requires diligence on both your part and ours, implants remain an effective, long-term choice for dental restoration. In fact, some studies indicate upwards of 95% success rate. Proper hygiene will greatly increase your chances for many years of service from your implants.

If you would like more information on properly maintaining your dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Maintenance.”


By Woodland Family Dentistry
December 26, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: celebrity smiles  
JohnStamosBritneySpearsandHowtoRelaxDuringDentalTreatment

We're always tickled to see dentists represented in popular culture, especially when portrayed by an actor as handsome as John Stamos. On the hit television show Glee, Stamos played a dentist who made sure the glee club members cleaned up their act when it came to oral hygiene — though perhaps he used a bit too much anesthesia to achieve this admirable goal. While under his care — and lots of sedation — several Glee characters had music-infused hallucinations in which they danced and sang with pop star Britney Spears.

Far-fetched? No doubt. Still, it's worth mentioning that sedation has its place in dentistry. In fact, if you are someone who tends to get anxious or even fearful about dental treatment, you should know that sedation can help you relax both mind and body so you can feel peaceful rather than anxious in the dentist's chair. And that's the whole point: Fear of pain should not stand in the way of your getting the care that will keep you healthy and allow you to keep your teeth for as long as possible.

You may not know this, but when you are afraid, your threshold for pain is actually lower. You become hypersensitive to every sensation and sound, and you tense your muscles. Fear and anxiety trigger the release of certain chemicals that put you in “fight or flight” mode. In this heightened state of alert you experience more pain during and even after treatment.

The good news is that this response can virtually be eliminated with various oral sedatives and/or with nitrous oxide, which is inhaled. Both treatments will allow you to let your guard down and relax. Your apprehension and hypersensitivity to pain will disappear, even though you are still conscious. And when you are relaxed, we are better able to focus on the task at hand, knowing that you are comfortable.

The sedatives used in dentistry have been subjected to rigorous testing and have a strong safety record backed by decades of use. Several even have “amnesic” properties, meaning that you will remember little to nothing of your treatment — unless, of course, you end up singing and dancing with Britney Spears!

If you would like more information about sedation in dentistry, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Oral Sedation Dentistry.” Dear Doctor also has more on “Overcoming Dental Fear & Anxiety.”


By Woodland Family Dentistry
December 11, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: partial denture  
TemporaryToothReplacementwithFlexiblePartialDentures

Modern dentistry offers several great ways to permanently replace missing teeth, including high-tech dental implants and traditional fixed bridgework. But sometimes, for one reason or another, it isn’t possible to have these treatments done right away. If you need an aesthetic way to temporarily replace missing teeth, a flexible partial denture could be the answer you’re looking for.

Certain kinds of removable partial dentures (RPDs) can be used as permanent tooth replacement systems, especially for people who aren’t candidates for dental implants or fixed bridges. But in the past, if you needed a temporary tooth replacement, one of the few alternatives was the type of rigid RPD often called a “flipper.” This consists of a firm, relatively thick acrylic base that supports one or more lifelike replacement teeth. It attaches to the “necks” of existing natural teeth via metal clasps, which gives it stability and strength.

However, the same rigidity and thickness that gives these rigid RPDs their durability can make them uncomfortable to wear, while the acrylic material they are made of is capable of staining or breaking. Over time, the RPDs are prone to coming loose — and they are also easy to flip in and out with the tongue, which gives them their nickname.

Flexible partial dentures, by contrast, are made of pliable polyamides (nylon-like plastics) that are thin, light and resistant to breakage. Instead of using metal wires to attach to the teeth, flexible RPDs are held securely in place by thin projections of their gum-colored bases, which fit tightly into the natural contours of the gumline. Their elasticity and light weight can make them more comfortable to wear. Plus, besides offering aesthetic replacements for missing teeth, their natural-looking bases can cover areas where gums have receded — making existing teeth look better as well.

All RPDs must be removed regularly for thorough cleaning — but it’s especially important for flexible RPD wearers to practice excellent oral hygiene. That’s because the projections that hold them in place can also trap food particles and bacteria, which can cause decay. And, like most dentures, RPDs should never be worn overnight. Yet with proper care, flexible RPDs offer an inexpensive and aesthetic way to temporarily replace missing teeth.

If you have questions about removable partial dentures, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.




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